Why did I need to get my teeth checked?

An analysis of the dental history of 1,200 children aged 6 to 12 revealed a higher rate of dental decay in boys.

The research published in the American Journal of Preventive Dentistry showed the most common reasons for tooth decay were poor nutrition, stress, stress of the parents and their children, and the stress of a home environment.

“The stress of living with a child in a home where they are under constant pressure, as well as the stress in a new environment, all add to the risk of tooth erosion.” “

Dr Stowe added that the researchers were surprised by the finding, given that dentistry had been shown to reduce the risk in children and adults by increasing the amount of fluoride in toothpastes. “

The stress of living with a child in a home where they are under constant pressure, as well as the stress in a new environment, all add to the risk of tooth erosion.”

Dr Stowe added that the researchers were surprised by the finding, given that dentistry had been shown to reduce the risk in children and adults by increasing the amount of fluoride in toothpastes.

However, he said it was important to remember that the link was not absolute.

“If we are looking at the overall dental health of a population, we don’t really need to look at the kids’ dental history,” he said.

Dr Stow said he was surprised by his finding, which also showed a higher prevalence of tooth loss in boys, especially in older boys.

“It’s surprising, because it was one of the more surprising findings,” he told BBC Radio 5 Live.

“I was really surprised by that, because I thought the risk was probably much higher in older children.”

Dr Mike Stowe said children in poor families were more at risk of teeth erosion, especially at the older age, compared to those in good families.

He said: I think it is a bit of a surprise, and a bit disheartening, but I think that is something that is important to recognise and think about.

“There is a lot of pressure in a household to look after your children, whether it is to look out for their health or look after their teeth.”

Dr David Tett, from the British Dental Society, said it appeared that some factors, such as the lack of toothpaston, were responsible for a greater risk of dental erosion.

“Teeth decay is very common among boys and it is probably because boys don’t have a good tooth care, and so they get a little bit of stress in that period of time,” he explained.

Dr Tett said the findings had highlighted the need for parents to make sure their children had a regular dental check-ups.

“What we do know is that children in families where there are many stressors and challenges can have a higher risk of developing dental decay,” he added.

Dr Matthew Dyer, from University College London, said the research was an important contribution to understanding the underlying factors that lead to tooth decay in children.

The research also found children with lower levels of dental health, such the presence of osteoarthritis, had higher rates of tooth damage. “

For some children, such risks are greater, especially those whose parents are struggling to meet the daily demands of a child.”

The research also found children with lower levels of dental health, such the presence of osteoarthritis, had higher rates of tooth damage.

“These results are particularly relevant as the prevalence of dental disease is increasing in children in the UK,” Dr Dyer said.

The researchers also said they hoped their research would encourage families to take action to reduce stress, improve nutrition and reduce stress within their homes.

“Many families with children living in insecure environments may be at increased risk of experiencing dental decay, which may in turn lead to increased risk for the health of their children,” they said.

Source: RTE